Houses are like friends – they need time!

I was talking the other day to some friends, and they were curious about how long I had been in my “new house”.  Actually we moved from our old house about 3 years ago! They were shocked, how could that be, they said, it only seems like yesterday! Time goes fast.

It made been think about the role of a house in our lives, apart from the obvious, and when does a house become a home?  We had lived 22 years in our old house, one we had loved from the day we saw it, even though it had purple walls (always a great colour for hearty discussions), weird exposed beams and a very low roof line at the back.  What it also had was these beautiful big trees, and lots of space, not that we had any kids at that time.

But as we lived there and time went on, had our two boys and grew as a family, our shared experiences in that house also grew.  We had all the ups and downs that go with raising a family and working, but also the many times we celebrated milestones, whether they be birthdays, christenings, Christmas gatherings, anniversaries or just days when we went outside to play the endless games of cricket, or football or soccer, or laid on the trampoline to watch the stars.  Many people came to that house, to share life with us, dinners, meetings, afternoons with the kids.  In fact I think that sometimes we would have 20 kids running around the back yard, screaming and yelling and having a great time.

The house became a home, our home, and even though it took us almost 10 years to paint the purple walls, and do anything with the exposed beams and the exposed plumbing, we loved it.

So when does that happen, when does a house become a home!  When we share the experiences of life within it.  When we come together as friends, family and neighbours and give one another time, and love, and food and drink (yes of course the odd class of wine).  When we share the sorrow and loss and the joy and hope that comes with journeying together.  When we practise hospitality.

It can be the smallest house, the ugliest house, the messiest house (that’s us) but when it is open and welcoming it becomes a place of community.

So it takes time. I think our new house has finally become a home to us!

But the whole house/ home transformation led me to think about friendships in the same way. They also need time.

I love looking at the art of friendship because it is so essential to our lives.  We are not meant to be islands, alone in the world, but connected at our core to one another.  And that can be just 1 or 2 people, or it can be a whole lot more, depending on our personality and circumstances.

We have friends we have known a long time and friends who have travelled with us a short distance.  Friends who were part of our journey in past years but who now have gone in a different direction. And friends who we lost contact with but are now again part of our day to day existence.  This reflects the diversity of our lives and the people we meet along the way who enrich it, even for a little while.

But of course we cannot be friends with every single person that we meet, we would go crazy, but those who we are connected to, are to be nurtured as a gift to our lives.

So at any time and stage, friendship takes time.   And takes shared experiences.  And takes love and care and commitment for them to grow and be sustained.  And sometimes it takes sacrifice, for life at times can be very hard and difficult and the only comfort people have is a familiar hand reaching out and holding them.  Deep friendships, the friendships that will last a life time, the friendships that will see us sharing a park bench when we are 70 are those that survive the pain and sorrow of life as well as the joys.

I have seen this recently, when an older couple, friends and life partners were at church.  Both stepped up to take communion, and the man, who has dementia, lost his way.  He took the bread and the wine, which is in a small glass container, and suddenly did not know where he was, or which way he should go to find his seat.  He started heading in the wrong direction, when a comforting arm was placed around him, a soothing voice suggested he turn around, a voice that spoke lovingly and one he could trust.

He looked to see where the voice was coming from, and was reassured.  He let himself be guided by his best friend, back to his seat.

In that moment, all the life experience they had shared, all the joy and sorrow, all the light and dark, was summed up in that care and love. I could not help but shed tears, for the sadness and the beauty of it.

But I have seen it in the love my old boss at university had for a colleague who was suffering from motor neurone disease.  Every week for a long time he would take him swimming in the University pool, initially just helping him a little with balance, but by the end he was carrying him into the water and holding him up, so that for a little while he could feel free. What a gift.

And I have seen it in the love and care shown to my beautiful friends whose gorgeous boys have died.

 

So when does a house become a home, when does an acquaintance become a friend, and when does a friend become a lifelong friend.

I think it is pretty simple. It is when what we see on the outside doesn’t matter, when what is in the heart, in the centre, that connects us to the house or to the person, is the only thing that matters!

And I think that takes time, takes commitment, and perhaps takes a few glasses of wine shared along the way!

 

Karen

A song to meditate on!

Lean on me – Seal

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: