Things are sometimes not what they seem!

The Camino is not just another walk, certainly not for me, it is an experience like no other, even in 40 degree heat!  it is a walk that constantly surprises me, and when I least expect it.

Let me share some of these surprises with you, they may strike a chord, reminding you as it does me that life is full of mystery and joy, if we are open to it.

So here we are after a few days on the Camino.  And it has been hot, really, really hot.  As most Spanish would tell you, it is very unseasonal, in fact so surprising that they continually want to talk about the weather.  Which in itself is very unusual. We have been baking in the mid-day sun, but in response the locals have been particularly friendly, looking concerned about our welfare, and even offering water.  Perhaps they are thinking they might lose a peregrino (walker) or two doing the heatwave!

The walk has taken us over the highest point of the Camino and through some gorgeous scenery.   At 1500 feet, it beats the path through the Pyrenees which starts the Camino, again a surprising fact. It reminds me so much of some parts of the Cape to Cape walk in Western Australia, with its rock climbing and bush.

While the walking has been quite difficult and doesn’t allow for too much reflection, in case one falls, we surprisingly came across a labyrinth made out of stone, near one of the descents.  Incredible!  A small labyrinth, only 3 circles, but enough to take a break and a breather and gather our thoughts for the day.  Out in the middle of nowhere, as this was one of the most isolated parts of the Camino, we had a little gift left for us! Makes me realise, if someone can make a labyrinth here, we can make one at Wembley Downs Uniting Church!

The section we are doing however does have one of the most important landmarks for people to reflect at, the Cruz de Hierro or Iron Cross, which seems to date from the 11th century.  When people get to the cross they place pebbles at its base to remember loved ones, or to signify a change in their life, or to leave something behind.  Either way there is a mound of pebbles now around the cross.  It is a hugely significant for people on the walk.  I knew about the cross, and was looking forward to seeing it and perhaps have a quiet and sacred moment there.   But my imagination did not live up to reality.

It in fact was more like a carnival.  The cross itself is very near the road, and nothing like I imaged, perhaps I have been too influenced by a movie!  Anyway when we reached it there were a lot of people milling about, taking photos, and generally having a party.  While we also took some photos and placed some stones, to remember our mums, and for our friends Rose, Rod and Ingrid who are fighting ill health, a work colleague, Preetha, who recently had a serious accident, and a beautiful family from church who has just lost their son and brother, it seemed to be just a bit crazy.  It certainly wasn’t what I expected. I have to say I was a bit disappointed with my quiet reflective moment.

As we trudged off, a surprising thought came to me.  All moments are sacred, life is sacred and just because I couldn’t do it “the right way” at the iron cross wasn’t really an issue! I still love and care for my friends and family and I still miss my mum.

A bit further down the track we came across a smaller cross, with a mound of pebbles at its base.  And suddenly the sacred moment I was looking for at the iron cross revealed itself. There was no one else around, and in this quiet spot, I placed some pebbles, and said a prayer. It wasn’t a great big cross, or a tall pole, or a significant landmark on the way, it was a just a place to reflect and think and send some love.

Bit like the labyrinth, it was an unexpected beautiful gift that someone had left. But these gifts are everywhere, if we have eyes to see.

But the time so far on the Camino has not just been about the scenery or the crosses.

While we have been spoilt with the mountains and forests, we have also been through some beautiful tiny villages, and have meet some wonderful people. People and places who have been surprises in themselves.  More unexpected surprises!

After reaching the highest point, we headed for a town call El Acebo.  It is quite small, but has 2 Albergues (small hostel) with the same name.  What!  Anyway as we were getting hotter and more exhausted, we kept seeing advertisements for this new Albergue, with fantastic facilities, including a swimming pool!  Ah bliss we thought when it was so hot and there was no shade and the path down was quite treacherous!

Unfortunately, when we entered the town we realised that our Albergue was not the new one, but the older one, and with no swimming pool!!  Our disappointment was palpable.  Particularly when our bags weren’t there, as they had gone to the other one!!!

We gritted our teeth and made the most of it, but what is quite surprising, is that the Albergue turned out to be comfortable, airy, with very friendly staff, and we met there some lovely people.  Peggy from Holland, walking on her own, as many people seem to be doing on this part of the Camino, and Marie and Herbert, an older couple from Germany.  So it was the right place to be, even without the pool!

We all had dinner together, well more than together, because as Marie and Herbert waited too long to order that the kitchen closed, they shared ours, a surprise, since I had half eaten mine.  As they say sharing is caring.  Herbert and Marie did not look like people who would walk the Camino, let alone having been here before, so I quickly have learnt that on the Camino anything is possible. In fact, that is what I also love about our fellow walkers, people can be walking the whole thing, a section, can be carrying all their possessions, or just a day pack, and can speak Spanish or some terrible version of it, like us.  It doesn’t matter, we are all people on the way!

We subsequently meet up with Maria and Herbert by chance in Ponferrada, at the town’s Knights Templar castle, then at a beautiful outdoor bar after seeing the castle, and then again the next morning at breakfast which was a complete surprise.  We did not know they were also staying at our accommodation.  Ah the mystery of the Camino!

There have been other surprises, the fact that I came to the walk having had achilles problems with my left leg for months, but since being here, while I have had blisters and sore feet, my achilles is perfect!

Or the fact that I carried a rain jacket, jumper and poncho for the potential change in the weather for 3 days, until I realised there isn’t going to be a change! That wasn’t a surprise, just stupidity!

So the Camino, even the second time seems to have captured my heart and continues to teach me some valuable lessons.  Which I hope to remember when I get back.  Perhaps I need to come every few years!!!

From our new friends, who were surpising in their ability to walk such long distances, and to eat my left over food, to our wonderful little Albergue to the weather, to the cross, to the labyrinth, sometimes things are not what they seem.  Sometimes life can be much more than our expectations imagine it to be. We need to be open to people and to places, for all can teach us. There is no perfect cross, no one sacred place, no perfect peregrine or perfect way to walk the Camino, no perfect Albergue, and no ideal way to live life.  We are all working it out as we go along.

So as we move further on the Camino, we realise how open it makes us.  Open to those walking with us and open to be surprised.

For sometimes things are not what they seem.

Karen

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: